Nursing CPD Points and You

Nursing CPD Points and You

Across the nursing sector, Continuing Professional Development (CPD) is a vital part of ensuring that today’s workforce is kept up to date with the latest developments.

Whether it’s learning a new skill or refreshing existing knowledge, CPD is designed to not only ensure you are fit for practice as a nurse, but can also enhance your future career opportunities. It’s also a prerequisite for nurses to renew their nursing registration.

What are Nursing CPD Points?

As a nurse, you need to complete 35 hours of learning that is relevant to your area of practice. This needs to be completed during the 3 years since your last registration (or following your initial registration if you are newly qualified).

The CPD must include at least 20 hours of participatory learning (in other words learning that involves interacting with one or more professionals) and you will need to keep accurate records of what training you have undertaken. You gain 1 nursing CPD point or credit for each hour of study or training that you do.

There are a wide range of opportunities and ways to complete CPD for today’s modern nurses. For instance, you may want to do some e-learning at home on your computer or you might prefer to attend ‘live’ events such as study days. You might even want to undertake longer courses to add certain skills or qualifications to your CV. Many employers, including agencies, provide at least some access to CPD or support for the courses that you choose to take.

Why Do Nurses Need CPD points?

CPD enables you to remain up to date with the latest practices and research, and develop new skills that will benefit your nursing career. Nurses and midwives must register with the NMC (Nursing and Midwifery Council) and undertaking the 35 hours of CPD is mandatory if you want to continue practising in the UK.

What Are the Benefits for Nurses?

While getting 35 nursing CPD points is mandatory, it also presents numerous benefits for you as a nurse, not least ensuring your skills and training are advanced with the latest evidence-based practice. As a nurse, of course, you have a duty to deliver the best level of care, whatever environment you work in.

If you are looking to develop your career, CPD points are vital as evidence that you are serious about your career development. CPD is also a way to demonstrate to future employees that you have the necessary skills and expertise to carry out your job adequately.

Choosing the Right CPD Courses

Making sure you gather the mandatory number of nursing CPD points over the three-year period of your registration is more than just a box-ticking exercise. Understanding what you should focus on and how this will impact on your future career is important. It pays to do some careful research and map out your learning to ensure that you are making the most of each opportunity.

For more info, The RCN provides some great guidance on CPD on their website

Go Nurse is The Stress Free Nursing Agency for London nurses. Our nurses accept shifts, update availability, see upcoming shifts and find shift locations simply via our easy to use mobile phone app! Is it time you made a change? Register online today for nursing shifts across London.

Benefits of a Nursing Career in the UK

Benefits of a Nursing Career in the UK

Most of those who work in nursing will tell you it’s more than just a career, it’s a calling. Providing care for patients at the most critical time in their life is rewarding and challenging. It’s a job where no one day is quite like another. But choosing to pursue a nursing career in the UK comes with a whole host of benefits too. Here are just a few we’d like to mention:

Nurses Are Always in Demand

There is a shortage of nurses at the moment and the NHS recently launched a recruitment campaign to inspire people to join the profession. While there are job opportunities across the NHS there’s also the private sector which offers massive opportunity. A UK nurse can find themselves working in a local hospital, a care home or providing support for a school or even a multi-national corporation.

Flexible Working

Pursuing a nursing career in the UK will offer you the option to work flexibly. Some nurses choose to work full-time, while others decide to work part time, perhaps while they are bringing up a family. You can find employment with a company or go through an agency if you want greater variety.

Nursing Career in the UK – Career Choices

Nursing in the UK gives you the opportunity to follow a wide range of career paths. You may qualify as a registered adult nurse or focus on an vocation like children’s nursing. There’s mental health, neonatal, prison nursing and a whole host of other routes you can follow.

Unlike some other healthcare professions, the ability to define your own career choices and build up your expertise is second to none. Its’ what many UK nurses like so much about the profession.

Good Rates of Pay

Nurses are well paid and what you earn will depend on the career path you choose. A nurse just starting out in the NHS can expect to earn a minimum of £22k per year while an advanced nurse practitioner can take home as much as £72K per year. If you work in the private sector and develop your career there, you can often expect to earn a lot more. Agency nurses such as those who work for Go Nurse can expect to earn between £17 to £26 per hour, depending on the shift.

Working With a Healthcare Team

Nursing involves liaising and working with a wide range of different healthcare professionals. That’s not just doctors, other nurses and surgeons but physiotherapists, paramedics, osteopaths, dieticians and radiographers to name just a few. One of the things that often attracts an individual to pursue a nursing career in the UK is the sheer diversity of the role and what it involves.

Continuing Professional Development

The learning support and continuous personal development of a nursing career is also one of the big benefits. CPD or continuing professional development is a key priority in this sector and you’ll always have plenty of opportunities to move your career forward. CPD can vary from simple one day top up courses to university studies including at Masters level.

It’s a Career You Can Take Anywhere

Finally, training to be a nurse in the UK means that you achieve a qualification that is recognised across the world. This provides you a whole host of opportunity to travel and work in different countries and with professionals from across the globe.

If you are considering your future, it is worth considering pursuing a nursing career in the UK.

 

Go Nurse is The Stress Free Nursing Agency for London nurses. Our nurses accept shifts, update availability, see upcoming shifts and find shift locations simply via our easy to use mobile phone app! Is it time you made a change? Register online today for nursing shifts across London.

 

Why You Should Consider a Career in Nursing

Why You Should Consider a Career in Nursing

There are few careers that attract such widespread admiration as nursing. People go into this element of healthcare profession for a whole variety of reasons, most notably because they want to help others. There’s no doubt that a career in nursing is challenging. But it’s also life changing, exciting and highly rewarding. You could end up working in a busy hospital, for a GP service, in the community or a care home.

 

Positively Impact the Lives of Other People

This is probably the number one reason why people choose the profession in the first place. You will be helping people at the time they need it most, whether you’re working in a busy A&E, on a cancer ward, helping elderly patients in a care home or providing care for sick children.

Nursing has always been seen as more a vocation than a career, something that you want to devote your time and your attention to. It’s also a very practical job – you’re not sitting behind a desk all day and the hours are not nine to five.

 

No Two Days Are The Same

Talk to most nurses and they’ll tell you the same thing – each day is hugely different. That’s what happens when you’re delivering care to other people. If you’re someone who likes variety and daily challenges that really mean something, a career in nursing should be somewhere near the top of your list of job options to explore.

 

Many Career in Nursing Options

There are a wide variety of nursing specialities you can go into. Amongst others there is adult, children’s, learning disability or mental health nursing. You also have employment options such as working in the NHS, or the private sector, working for an agency, or working for yourself!

There’s also plenty of opportunity for development – you can start out as a staff nurse and work up to become an experienced nurse practitioner in your chosen field. You can even head back to education and become involved in training the nurses of the future. Or you can visit patients at home as a district nurse.

 

Work for an Agency When It Suits You

One of the key factors in any job is getting the right work life balance. Nurses often end up working long and unsocial hours, we all know that. But it doesn’t have to be the case. You could choose to work for an agency like Go Nurse and accept shifts when they suit you. This is one of the benefits of a career in nursing.

 

Constant Learning and Growing

Nursing is a healthcare profession where you are continually developing yourself and not just through experience. You have the responsibility to maintain and update your knowledge and you will go on courses and constantly be updating your skills throughout your career. There’s the opportunity to specialise in certain areas and even to swap specialities or develop your skills and knowledge to masters level as you become an expert in your field.

To begin a career in nursing, you first need to get a degree in one of the four main branches. You can find out more on the NHS Careers website.

 

Go Nurse is The Stress Free Nursing Agency for London nurses. Our nurses accept shifts, update availability, see upcoming shifts and find shift locations simply via our easy to use mobile phone app! Is it time you made a change? Register online today for nursing shifts across London.

Building Cultural Competence in Nursing

Building Cultural Competence in Nursing

The world is a much smaller place than it was a decade or so ago as a result of globalisation. We have become exposed to different kinds of food and drink as well as cultures. Exposure however does not automatically lead to a deeper understanding of our diversity as people. As nurses, it is our duty to be more aware. We should provide care based on knowledge, communication skills and cultural competence in nursing. We cannot be indifferent to other cultures if we are to provide satisfactory patient care.

 

Tips on Building Cultural Competence in Nursing:

 

  1. Immerse Yourself in Other Cultures

Part of gaining cultural competence in nursing is having the ability to open ourselves up to the differences of our culture from others. This can only be done if we immerse ourselves through exchange programs, home visits, and direct patient care. In this manner you will be able to gain firsthand experience on other people’s culture as well as a better understanding on their beliefs and practices.

  1. Research and Enquire

Research or enquire about the things you have observed. Do not be afraid to ask your patients why things are the way they are in their religion or culture. However, be sensitive so as not to offend the people you are taking care of. This balance is a key skill towards cultural competence in nursing. Other ways to do your research besides asking is to read books and publications, undergoing training or workshops and online research.

  1. Learn How to Connect

For bilingual or multilingual nurses, connecting with foreign patients is easier if the nurse speaks in a familiar language. However, for those who only know English, communicating can be problematic. Knowing when to ask for the help of a colleague or an interpreter is then essential. When employing the help of a colleague or an interpreter remember to still direct your communication and engagement to the patient. Other ways in which you can communicate with a patient in spite of a language barrier is to use pictures or hand gestures.

  1. Consider Patient’s Health Beliefs and Values

There are a lot of things that affect a patient’s health beliefs and values. As a nurse, it is important that we are able to identify them so that we may integrate these factors into the care of a said patient. These can include economic, religious and dietary factors among others can help towards the utopia of cultural competence in nursing.

Go Nurse is The Stress Free Nursing Agency for London nurses. Is it time you made a change? Register online today for nursing shifts across London.

How to Avoid Nursing Burnout

How to Avoid Nursing Burnout

With the current healthcare work climate in the UK, it isn’t surprising to hear about nursing burnout more often. Working as a nurse is a demanding job that requires constant focus. It is highly challenging taking care of sick and vulnerable people and understaffing doesn’t help ease the stress. It is very important to ensure you avoid nursing burnout.

I remember one particular shift I had within a gastro ward of 28 patients. There was only myself and the Nurse Manager working that shift. It was overwhelming and in spite of the fact that the Matron on duty sent us another nurse and HCA, the responsibility was still immense. On my way home, I had never felt so exhausted and unsure of myself. Had I done the best I could to support and care for the people who had needed me?

As nurses we carry on and do as much as we can. We work hoping that the next shift will become easier. Nonetheless, the cycle of stress and often understaffing, continues.

 

Here are a few tips on how to avoid nursing burnout:

 

Find Your Purpose

Some individuals are in nursing not because they felt it was their calling, but for other well-meaning intentions, and that’s fine. However, if your heart is not in what you are doing, you will find that constantly having to “give yourself away” may be too exhausting. Contributing to nursing burnout.

Reflect and remember why you joined the nursing workforce. Think about the things in nursing that make you happy and fulfilled. Work on the areas that you find tedious. Assess whether the nursing specialty you’re in is really right for you. Perhaps you would be happier working in another speciality or unit?

 

Learn How To Delegate

Part of being an efficient and effective nurse is learning which tasks are essential to your role and then entrusting the “secondary’’ ones to a Healthcare Assistant. In this manner, you are able to achieve what is expected of you.

Consequently, if your Nursing Manager is allocating you more work than you can handle, you should address this with them to avoid nursing burnout. You aren’t doing your patients a disservice by refusing or questioning work added to your load, on the contrary, you are actually doing them a favour by making sure that you are fit and safe to work by balancing your workload.

 

Manage Stress

Keep a diary and record your daily routine. This will help you identify the things that exhaust and wear you down most. When you have identified these factors, learn how to deal with them constructively either through exercise, meditation, breathing exercises and the likes.

Situations may at times feel dire, but part and parcel of surviving this job is knowing what is expected of you. Learning what is being asked of you is part of knowing your purpose.

Setting professional boundaries as well as delegation is vital to teamwork. Also, do remember that taking care of others means also taking care of yourself. Why not take the nursing stress test and see how you are coping.

Go Nurse is The Stress Free Nursing Agency for London nurses. Is it time you made a change? Register online today for nursing shifts across London.

Top tips for Nurses Returning to Work

Top tips for Nurses Returning to Work

It isn’t unusual for nurses to take a career detour these days. Actually, it seems to be becoming more of the norm as medical professionals move to experience other environments or to decide whether their chosen field is really the one for them. In some instances individuals take time off to tend to a sick loved one or to start a family. This isn’t a negative and can assist in the development of nurses returning to work.

As a nurse however, there are some things you need to do when you want to return to work, and there are ways you can best prepare yourself for your transition. Here are some top tips for nurses returning to work:

  1. Review

Getting back into the nursing profession takes a lot of persistence and commitment. It is imperative that you take the time to re-familiarise yourself with the necessary updated skills and knowledge. Review your nursing fundamentals and practice regular tasks like how to take vital signs, how to insert IVs and so on. The internet is probably one of the best resources for updating your skills and there are many websites that you can turn to such as:

https://www.nmc.org.uk/

https://www.rcn.org.uk/professional-development/become-a-nurse

  1. Enrol in refresher courses

It is now easier for nurses returning to work with universities and hospitals offering refresher courses mandated by the NMC. You are able to re-acquaint yourself with the profession and update yourself in terms of technology, equipment and treatment.

The NHS RTP or Return to Practice Programme is an option for nurses returning to work, and can either be taken full-time or part-time https://comeback.hee.nhs.uk/

  1. Volunteer

A great way of easing yourself into the industry again is by volunteering in a local clinic or nursing home. What better avenue to practice and apply your new found knowledge and skills from your refresher course than being where the action is? This is also a good opportunity to begin building your professional network again.

At Go Nurse we support nurses returning to work by finding available shifts in nursing homes relative to the area that the nurses reside in. If you would like us to assist you, apply here 

  1. Brush-up on technology

As a healthcare professional, you will always work in a dynamic environment. Changes and advances occur as diseases and illnesses evolve and we are constantly trying to find new and advanced ways to treat and combat them. This means new equipment, software, and treatments.

  • Brush-up on your computer use and knowledge.
  • Take advantage of situations when volunteering or working in a healthcare environment.
  • Try to learn how to use new technology and equipment.
  1. Be confident

Once a nurse, always a nurse. Although things change and the need to adapt is essential, nursing fundaments remain the same. Your experience won’t diminish and you don’t have to relearn everything from the beginning. You will always be a valuable and vital part of the medical and healthcare industry.

Nurses returning to work, know that there are resources and support available to you to assist you in your transition back into the workplace. We would be happy to help, get in touch or on 01978 227271.

Go Nurse is The Stress Free Nursing Agency for London nurses. Is it time you made a change? Register online today for nursing shifts across London.